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Mad Max meets X-Men in this razor-sharp new dystopian novella by the Philip K Dick award nominated author of Velocity Weapon.

It doesn't matter what you call her. Riley. Burner. She forgot her name long ago. But if you steal from the supply lines crossing the wasteland, her face is the last one you'll see.
 
She is the force of nature that keeps the balance in the hot arid desert. Keep to yourself and she'll leave you well enough alone. But it's when you try to take more than you can chew that her employers notice and send her off to restore the balance.
 
Then she gets the latest call. A supply truck knocked over too cleanly. Too precise. And the bodies scattering the wreckage weren't killed by her normal prey of scavengers. These bodies are already rotting hours after the attack.
 
Cowering in the corner of the wreckage is a young girl. A girl that shouldn't be there. A girl with violently blue eyes. Just like hers.

What's Inside

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Reader Reviews

Praise

"O'Keefe peppers her dusty, cinematic landscape with tough and gritty characters you can't help but fall in love with. The First Omega absorbs you in a story that feels like it was happening before you picked it up and continues long after you put it down."—Andrea Stewart, author of The Bone Shard Daughter
"Megan O'Keefe once again proves to be a masterful storyteller who can bend any words to her will. The First Omega is a breathtaking ride through the desert that will keep you on the edge of your seat the whole way."—K.B. Wagers, author of the Farian War Trilogy
"A tale of humanity on the edges, as fierce and sharp as a blade and the women who wield them."—Anna Stephens, author of the Godblind trilogy
"Sharp as a knife in the dark, subversive and surprising, The First Omega is a blistering and satisfying read." -- Karen Osborne, author of Architects of MemoryKaren Osborne, author of Architects of Memory
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